Feb 062017
 

2017 Toyota Mirai - Toyota’s hydrogen-powered car

In 2014, at the Los Angeles Auto Show, Toyota unveiled its Mirai hydrogen-powered car. Since then, it has been offered for sale in certain parts of the United States along with Japan, the UK, Denmark, Germany, Belgium, and Norway. However, it seems Toyota’s hydrogen-powered car may be heading off to new parts of the world soon.

Toyota is collaborating with top energy companies in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to start testing the use of hydrogen-powered vehicles in the region. The first hydrogen station will be built in the country, with construction to begin in May. Once the station is finished, the Toyota Mirai will undergo intense testing in the UAE’s hot climate.

The introduction of the Mirai is part of the UAE’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions. The Mirai only emits water. In addition, it fuels up just like a traditional car instead of needing to be plugged in. Along with that benefit, the Mirai has a longer driving range than traditional EVs. It has an estimated driving range of 312 miles with a full tank of hydrogen.

Along with its worldwide expansion, Toyota is working with energy developers here in the United States to increase the hydrogen infrastructure. In fact, hydrogen stations are under construction right here in the Northeast.

Would you ever consider driving the Toyota Mirai?

Dec 182015
 

Turning trash into carsThere are many more sources of harmful emissions than just cars. Decomposing trash in landfills, for example, produce enormous amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas.

Now, Toyota is taking out two birds with one stone by converting some of that methane into electricity at its Georgetown, KY, manufacturing plant.

The automaker is committed to largely eliminating CO2 emissions from its vehicles and plants by 2050 by launching new cars like the Mirai hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and using alternate energy sources like solar, wind, and local renewable energy.

After fleshing out a plan in 2010 with Waste Services, Toyota began building a generator at the Central Kentucky Landfill last year, which has just come online. After burning the methane, an underground line takes the electricity produced around 6.5 miles to the plant, truly turning trash into cars.

“We will generate one megawatt (1 million watts) per hour at the site,” said Dave Absher, Toyota’s environmental strategies manager. “That’s enough annual energy generation to produce approximately 10,000 vehicles. The system can eventually be scaled up to 10 megawatts per hour.”

 

 

Dec 042015
 

Toyota using compressed natural gasEvery Toyota we sell at Hurlbert Toyota can be appreciated for its high fuel economy and low emissions—and now Toyota Transport, the automaker’s vehicle transportation trucking company, is working toward making your new Toyota cleaner before you even start it.

As part of a joint collaboration with Peterbilt and Cottrell, Inc., Toyota designed its first car hauler that runs on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). The benefits are clear: the truck emits 85% less overall particulate matter and 10% less carbon dioxide, technically making the cars it transports to the dealership even cleaner than they already are.

Even though the alternate-fuel tanks take up a lot of space, Toyota and Peterbilt and Cottrell were able to modify the truck so that no vehicle hauling space was compromised.

The truck will drive around 8,000 miles per month and will be compared to the company’s current diesel transportation trucks based on performance and efficiency.

“We started exploring the CNG option more than three years ago, and it has been worth the wait,” said Kirk Welch, Senior Analyst, Toyota Transport Compliance. “Natural gas is the cleanest burning fossil fuel and will help Toyota advance our environmental efforts to reduce fleet emissions.”

Jun 222015
 

Environmental Milestone

Everyone, including Toyota, knows the importance of protecting the environment. This is why Toyota is proud to be named one of the world’s greenest companies. Newsweek recently included Toyota in its list of the greenest Global 500 companies.

Toyota comes in at #35, a jump of 57 spots over last year’s results. Toyota is also #2 among car manufacturers. To measure environmental performance, Newsweek used eight metrics, including energy, water, and waste levels.

“We are proud to be recognized as one of the world’s greenest companies,” said Jim Lentz, Toyota Motor North America chief executive officer, in a statement. “Through continuous improvement, our global teams have made great strides in reducing our environmental impact. From hybrids to fuel cells, Toyota is at the forefront of developing energy efficient technologies. We are deeply committed to contributing to the environment, our communities, and to leading the future of sustainable mobility.”

In addition to producing fuel-efficient, green vehicles, Toyota has been working on reducing its carbon footprint in other areas, too. In North America, Toyota has saved more than 93 million gallons of water and reduced energy by 22% at its manufacturing facilities.

If you’re interested in making your life a little greener, come check out Toyota’s fuel-efficient, green lineup at Hurlbert Toyota.

May 042015
 

Toyota Mirai FCV Concept

According to a recent announcement, the brand new 2016 Toyota Mirai model – a hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle that emits only water out of its tailpipe – set the pace for the Toyota Owners 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race on April 25th.

This makes the innovative 2016 Mirai the first ever hydrogen-powered pace car at a NASCAR race. The Toyota Mirai pace car set the standard for the racers, but it is also setting a standard for green driving.

The Mirai led the Sprint Cup Series field all the way to the green flag at the Richmond International Raceway. The decision to include the Mirai represents an enormous shift in technology: the first utilization of a hydrogen-powered vehicle in NASCAR.

However – it’s worth nothing that this sort of game-changing moment isn’t new for Toyota, who also brought the first ever hybrid car to pace a NASCAR race in 2009, for the Coca Cola 600. What could be next?

Mar 092015
 

 

Toyota FCV Concept

The Toyota FCV Concept that led to the Mirai.

The future is looking a whole lot brighter with Toyota’s ‘bright green’ new technology. We are of course talking about hydrogen fuel which is stored in cells and used in the new hydrogen powered Toyota Mirai, which is slated for production starting this year. This move marks “a turning point in automotive history,” according to Toyota.

The fuel cell that Toyota is bringing to market will not only drive farther than most battery cars, but fill-up (with hydrogen) in mere minutes instead of charging batteries which can take hours. The Mirai will use compressed hydrogen to propel the car around 300 miles at which time it can be refilled in approximately five minutes. One of the more appealing aspects to this Toyota is that it will be burning hydrogen, along with a catalyst, then emitting pure water.

Toyota will build 700 of the Mirai this year and will be available for a staring price of $60,000 starting in Japan and soon making its way to the States. Stay tuned for more exciting Toyota breakthroughs at Hurlbert Toyota, where your future and ours move forward together.

Jan 122015
 

 

Toyota

Though it might be hard to believe at first, Toyota recently made over 5,600 fuel-cell patents open to the public, royalty-free. So why would Toyota make all of its research open? Apparently, this move is designed to encourage other automakers to follow suit and make the auto industry more eco-friendly overall.

The jaw-dropping announcement came during the 2015 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) after Toyota showed off some of its new technology. According to Digital Trends, this gives manufacturers free use of Toyota fuel-cell technology for fuel cell system software, fuel cell stacks, high-pressure tanks, and hydrogen supply and production systems. Basically, it’s everything you need to build your own Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV).

“At Toyota, we believe that when good ideas are shared, great things can happen,” said Bob Carter, Senior VP of Automotive Operations at Toyota Motor Sales. “The first generation hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, launched between 2015 and 2020, will be critical, requiring a concerted effort and unconventional collaboration between automakers, government regulators, academia, and energy providers.”

Although manufacturers are encouraged to go crazy, Toyota does have some stipulations. The information cannot be used for anything other than FCVs and the offer expires in 2020. By then, Toyota hopes the industry will have come far enough that fuel cell technology dominates. At Hurlbert Toyota, we’re excited to see what other automakers will do with this new information.

Aug 122014
 

Toyota recognizes the importance of giving back to its community and recently donated approximately $100,000 towards the Blue Springs Water Garden project in Blue Springs, Mississippi.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi is proud to call Blue Springs its home. The park will have features for all ages to enjoy, including a picnic pavilion, play structure, butterfly garden, and a community garden that focuses on Toyota’s sustainability and conservation efforts.

“We could not have asked for a better corporate and community partner and we are thrilled to work with Toyota on this project,” said Blue Springs Mayor, Rita Gentry, in a statement. “This park will serve as a symbol of the wonderful relationship we share with Toyota and will be a safe community space that all our residents can enjoy. We have bright future together.”

Construction on the park will be completed by September 20, 2014, in time for Toyota’s National Public Lands Day event. Both Toyota team members and members of the Blue Springs community will work together to build the park.

While Blue Springs, Mississippi may be far from us here at Hurlbert Toyota, we are proud to see Toyota working to become an integral part of its community by working together with local residents.

Aug 042014
 
Toyota Hydrogen Fuel Cell Concept Car

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle concept car

Toyota is making headway in the production of its first fuel cell vehicle. The automaker released a timeline and approximate pricing of the revolutionary sedan that runs on hydrogen and emits no CO2.

Currently, with support of the Japanese government, Toyota plans to roll out the new cars in Japan before the end of March 2015 with a price tag slated around 70,000 USD.

The fuel cell sedans are expected to deliver a 435-mile driving range on a single tank of hydrogen; and Toyota has already stated it will try to offer hydrogen fuel at a price comparable to traditional gasoline.

The fueling, however, seems to be the automaker’s biggest challenge at the moment. Though Vice President Mitsuhisa Kato said hydrogen can even be produced from “sludge accumulated in the sewage system,” developing an infrastructure of which hydrogen fueling stations are a part will take some time and government cooperation.

In Japan, Toyota is making plans to build 100 stations in the next year. When Toyota’s fuel cell sedan becomes available in the U.S. and Europe it will be sold in areas equipped with the stations.

It sounds to us at Hurlbert Toyota like now would be a good time to raise awareness about these hydrogen fueling stations and petition to install them in our community. Fuel cell vehicles could positively impact our environment in ways we can’t even imagine.

Jun 272014
 
Toyota Hydrogen Fuel Cell Concept Car

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle concept car

Toyota is making headway in the production of its first fuel cell vehicle. The automaker released a timeline and approximate pricing of the revolutionary sedan that runs on hydrogen and emits no CO2.

Currently, with support of the Japanese government, Toyota plans to roll out the new cars in Japan before the end of March 2015 with a price tag slated around 70,000 USD.

The fuel cell sedans are expected to deliver a 435-mile driving range on a single tank of hydrogen; and Toyota has already stated it will try to offer hydrogen fuel at a price comparable to traditional gasoline.

The fueling, however, seems to be the automaker’s biggest challenge at the moment. Though Vice President Mitsuhisa Kato said hydrogen can even be produced from “sludge accumulated in the sewage system,” developing an infrastructure of which hydrogen fueling stations are a part will take some time and government cooperation.

In Japan, Toyota is making plans to build 100 stations in the next year. When Toyota’s fuel cell sedan becomes available in the U.S. and Europe it will be sold in areas equipped with the stations.

It sounds to us at Hurlbert Toyota like now would be a good time to raise awareness about these hydrogen fueling stations and petition to install them in our community. Fuel cell vehicles could positively impact our environment in ways we can’t even imagine.